June 15, 2006

Aha. Humor was hiding in reality and depression

Yes, it is depressing that some of our congresspeople are this stupid, but this is too damn funny to pass on. Trust me. Watch Colbert (thanks to Crooks and Liars) as he interviews a Republican congressman from Georgia who has co-sponsored a bill requiring the Ten Commandments be displayed in the House and Supreme Court. There are two priceless moments here: one when he explains the importance of the Ten C's to our culture: "if we are totally without them, we may lose our sense of direction." And the second is when he hears this question: "Colbert: What are the Ten Commandments? Westmoreland: You mean all of them?--Um... Don't murder. Don't lie. Don't steal Um... I can't name them all." Rough transcript, but watch it.

Damn funny. Damn funny that a guy co-sponsoring a bill requiring the Ten Commandments in public buildings because we need to know them doesn't actuall know them. Also funny, he says at one point that he would like to cut the department of Education. Funny because it seems like he already cut it--for himself.

2 comments:

Monk-in-Training said...

Very interesting video. I may have to put it on my blog also. Here in Oklahoma we have a monument that has a misspelled word. People don't look at these Commandments or know or most importantly live by them. It sadly has degenerated into an Idol, as far as I am concerned.

Leviticus 26:1
'You shall not make idols for yourselves; neither a carved image nor a sacred pillar shall you rear up for yourselves; nor shall you set up an engraved stone in your land, to bow down to it; for I am the Lord your God.

ubub said...

I caught the segment on Colbert and thought it was absolutely hilarious. Too often questions about what the Ten Commandments goes unasked because we all "know" what they are -- the foundation of Life, the Universe, and Everything because its all about the rules. It had sort of an emperor's new clothes feel to it because when Colbert dared to ask the question it became clear that this was a matter of promoting one's supposed piousness for political again. I agree with M-I-T - this is about a show of religiosity and has nothing to do with faith.